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A New Life for Hawk found injured on Otis ANGB

Sergeant Matthew Bass of Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection holds the re-habilitated Red Tailed hawk that was found injured at Otis ANGB on September 25. The hawk was released back into the wild on October 21 at the same location she was found.

Sergeant Matthew Bass of Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection holds the re-habilitated Red Tailed hawk that was found injured at Otis ANGB on September 25. The hawk was released back into the wild on October 21 at the same location she was found.

Sergeant Matthew Bass of Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection holds the re-habilitated Red Tailed hawk that was found injured at Otis ANGB on September 25. The hawk was released back into the wild on October 21 at the same location she was found.

Sergeant Matthew Bass of Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection holds the re-habilitated Red Tailed hawk that was found injured at Otis ANGB on September 25. The hawk was released back into the wild on October 21 at the same location she was found.

OTIS AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, Mass. -- It took a little convincing to get her out of the cage, but on October 21, a re-habilitated female Red Tailed hawk was released back into the wild on Otis Air National Guard Base, where she was originally found injured and unresponsive.

On September 25, 2011 the hawk was spotted on her back, unconscious, at the corner of Granville St. and Reilly St. at the telephone pole. The 102nd Security Forces Squadron responded to the call about the disabled bird and came to the scene.

Staff Sgt. David Patistea of the 102d SFS secured the area to protect the hawk which, by that time, was conscious and alert but too injured to fly. Sgt. Patistea contacted the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection and spoke to Sgt. Matthew Bass, a Mass. Environmental Police Officer, to find out how the bird could be best transported to safety.

Sgt. Bass responded to the scene himself and transported the hawk to the Cape Wildlife Center, which is operated by The Humane Society in partnership with The Fund for Animals, and promotes and protects the health and well-being of native wildlife and their habitats.

"The facility did a great job bringing the hawk back from its injury and the bird is surely grateful for the helping hand" said Bass. The cause of the injury was undetermined.