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NEVER FORGET: 102nd Intelligence Wing reflects on September 11 attacks

Capt. Derek White, Chaplain 102nd IW speaks to members of the 102nd during a 9/11 morning's service. By Staff Sgt. Veuril McDavid

Capt. Derek White, Chaplain 102nd IW speaks to members of the 102nd during a 9/11 morning's service. By Staff Sgt. Veuril McDavid

Members of the 102nd IW at morning's service pay tribute to the heroes and honor the memory of the victims of 9/11. By Staff Sgt. Veuril McDavid

Members of the 102nd IW at morning's service pay tribute to the heroes and honor the memory of the victims of 9/11. By Staff Sgt. Veuril McDavid

Chaplain White speaks to members of the 102nd IW honoring the memory of the victims of 9/11. By Staff Sgt. Veuril McDavid

Chaplain White speaks to members of the 102nd IW honoring the memory of the victims of 9/11. By Staff Sgt. Veuril McDavid

Members of the 102nd IW have a moment of silence for all the victims of 9/11. By Staff Sgt. Veuril McDavid

Members of the 102nd IW have a moment of silence for all the victims of 9/11. By Staff Sgt. Veuril McDavid

Otis Air National Guard -- In somber remembrances from New York City to Shanksville, Pa., from the White House to cities around the nation, individuals gathered to mark the 14th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks.

Members of the 102nd IW held their own ceremony, gathering in the chapel of building 158 to remember the nearly 3,000 people who were killed when Al-Qaida terrorists hijacked four commercial airplanes in coordinated suicide attacks on the U.S on Sept. 11, 2001.  Two of the planes were flown into the World Trade Center in New York, another hit the Pentagon and a fourth crashed in a field in Shanksville, Pa., before reaching its likely target of Washington, D.C.

"This day has impacted the lives of everyone in the military in the way our culture is different through our response to the attacks." said Capt. Derek White, Chaplain 102nd IW. "Remembering and praying together on this day is a way we continue to process and heal as a nation."

Like earlier generations that experienced dramatic events, ones that drastically changed American history, many of us can easily describe where we were, and what we were doing, on a September morning over a decade ago. Whether we were in grade school or college, just out of technical training or already a seasoned veteran, the morning of Sept. 11, 2001 is ingrained in most of our memories.

"This morning's service incorporated three prayers that acknowledged our mourning as a nation, our perseverance as a nation, and our hope for a better world.  We paused to remember the people we lost on this day and all our friends we have lost or been injured fighting in the wars we have fought in response," White said.